An illustrated guide to 2021’s pipeline battles


This story belongs to Livescience.Tech’s 2021 Comic Recap — an illustrated reflect on a few of the year’s most significant environment stories. To checked out the other installations, click on this link and here.

This was a huge year for pipeline policy. From the cancellation of the Keystone XL pipeline to specifies enacting extreme laws to criminalize and suppress pipeline demonstrations, the battle to stop oil and gas facilities saw significant wins — and significant losses — in 2021.

Livescience.Tech / Alexandria Herr

Joe Biden began his term in January by canceling the Keystone XL pipeline by means of executive order. That’s after more than a years of Indigenous-led advocacy versus the task.

Livescience.Tech / Alexandria Herr / Getty Images

But the tough-on-pipelines program didn’t last. In May, the Army Corps of Engineers maintained a Trump-period position, permitting the Dakota Access Pipeline to continue to run, regardless of the reality that a crucial license for the pipeline was canceled by a federal judge.

Livescience.Tech / Alexandria Herr

Over the summer season, protesters gathered to Northern Minnesota where the Line 3 pipeline, which brings tar sands oil throughout more than 200 bodies of water, threatens Anishanaabe treaty rights and might breach U.S. treaty law.

Livescience.Tech / Alexandria Herr / Getty Images

Over 900 hundred individuals were jailed in demonstrations over the summer season. Many are dealing with felony charges.

Livescience.Tech / Alexandria Herr

Despite demonstrations, the Biden administration did not cancel the pipeline, which went on the internet on October 1st.

Livescience.Tech / Alexandria Herr

According to analysis by the Indigenous Environmental Network, Indigenous-led resistance to 21 nonrenewable fuel source jobs has actually stopped or postponed greenhouse gas emissions comparable to a quarter of yearly U.S. and Canadian emissions – or about 400 coal-fired power plants.

Livescience.Tech / Alexandria Herr

But nationwide, the threats of opposing pipelines like Line 3 and Keystone XL are getting greater, as sixteen states have actually passed laws given that 2017 increasing charges, consisting of fines and prison time, for opposing pipelines. 

Livescience.Tech / Alexandria Herr

And Biden isn’t carrying on either Line 3 or DAPL, regardless of his environment dedications.

Livescience.Tech / Alexandria Herr

Despite Biden’s rejection to stop pipelines, there’s still hope: young Indigenous land protectors and water protectors, like 17-year-old Autumn Peltier, continue to battle the building and construction of oil and gas facilities on standard and treaty areas.

Livescience.Tech / Alexandria Herr

There’s no doubt demonstrations and legal battles versus significant nonrenewable fuel source facilities jobs will continue into 2022.

This story was initially released by Livescience.Tech with the heading An illustrated guide to 2021’s pipeline battles on Dec 23, 2021.

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