Comparing how fast a ball would fall 1 meter on the surface of different celestial bodies [reupload with timing fixed]


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Comparing how fast a ball would fall 1 meter on the surface of different celestial bodies [reupload with timing fixed]


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About the Author: livescience

35 Comments

  1. Note: I posted a version of this last week but took it down after a calculation error was pointed out.

    This comparison shows what a 1m freefall would look like in realtime on various bodies. I made this by taking this [source video](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xEqrvaWPdMI) and adjusting the playback rate according to the planet or moon’s surface gravity strength.

    In general (ignoring any atmospheric drag), the time `t` to freefall a height of `s` with acceleration due to gravity `a` can be calculated as `t = sqrt(2*s/a)`. On Earth `a` is about 9.8m/s^2. It’s 26m/s^2 on Jupiter and only 0.61m/s^2 on Pluto.

    Check out [this video](https://youtu.be/oYEgdZ3iEKA?t=59) of an astronaut dropping things on the moon to see a real example.

  2. So I’m just going to assume the original video is the earth video. Something tells me this is the right answer.

  3. Guessing that living on mars will have a very permanent affect on human biology and bone density. Still, the first few generations will be able to do so much to get the world set up!

  4. Random thought, you could edit all hands to be on normal speed and make just a ball fall in the slow motion to simulate that the person is actually at the other planets

  5. So on mars, we would have to increase the height of the basketball hoope proportionately to the difference in gravity?

  6. You should have done one for the sun, but I guess then we wouldn’t see it because you’d have to do it at night.

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