For high-speed target-tracking shots camera points at a lightweight, computer-controlled mirror instead of the object itself


For high-speed target-tracking shots camera points at a lightweight, computer-controlled mirror instead of the object itself


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45 Comments

  1. Really interested to see how it reacts to tracking a soccer ball during a game and how it is affected when the ball is blocked by someone- will it still be able to relatively “track it”? or at least compensate for those moments so it isn’t jarring when it reconnects with the ball. Also would be interested if another ball sitting on the sidelines would affect/distract it as well.

  2. Are these the same cameras/technology used to film those tank rounds flying throught the air?

  3. Real Genius (1985) already got this. Just be careful not to get anything smeared on your lens.

  4. The caption in the video says “Using a rotating mirror is a common method, but usually the mirror is in front of the camera, so a very large mirror is needed. ”

    The novel thing about this approach must be that the mirrors are **not** in front of the camera but elsewhere, like between the lens and sensor, enabling smaller, faster mirrors even for wide-angle shots.

  5. [The US Department of Defense has entered the chat]

    “Can y’all mount that thing to an armed drone in Yemen? Asking for a friend (the Saudis).”

  6. Does anyone know what they’re using for the detection part. I’ve used Blob Detection in the past (HSV color isolation from OpenCV) and that’s the fastest method that I’ve ever used.

    Would like to know about this one.

  7. That type of system is called a galvanometer for anyone curious.

    It’s often used alongside lasers at very high speed to turn them into cool patterns.

  8. Interesting — this mirror system is actually pretty standard in microscope design for guiding lasers

  9. I’d like to know what frame rate they can do this at.
    If its only 24 it sort of pointless as the blur is going to ruin anything fast anyway.
    Can they do this at 240fps?

    Edit: looks like the LG flatron is a 60hz monitor from what I can see.

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