Woodpeckers peck around 12,000 times a day, sometimes up to 20 times per second, with a force 10 times stronger than a human’s concussion threshold. (More info in the comments)


Woodpeckers peck around 12,000 times a day, sometimes up to 20 times per second, with a force 10 times stronger than a human’s concussion limit. (More info in the remarks)

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2 Comments

  1. To do this, they have reinforced skulls that are designed to spread the impact force, specifically coming from the direction of the beak. Interestingly, Woodpeckers are just as susceptible to death from a window collisions as other birds, as their skulls are reinforced only within the direction of the beak. The brain is kept safe from beak impacts by a special bone, known as the hyoid bone, that wraps all around the skull and acts as a seat belt for the brain, preventing its movement. ⠀

    A woodpecker’s tongue is also extremely long – about twice the length of the beak – and when not in use, the tongue curls all the way around the back of the skull between the bone and the skin. The tongues are sticky or barbed to assist in getting food from small crevices and holes. ⠀

    Woodpeckers do not have a typical song like other bird species (although they can chirp), but instead they make drumming sounds on trees to communicate.

  2. Let us take a moment to appreciate the effort of all the poor pre-woodpeckers that died prematurely due to concussions for this bird to become so badass though natural selection.

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