NASA’s Aqua satellite finds Dumazile sheared


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IMAGE: NASA’s Aqua satellite passed over Dumazile on March 7 and revealed a distinct low-level center of blood circulation and strong wind shear pressed the majority of the clouds south of the center …view more 

Credit: Credits: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Reaction Group

Vertical wind shear is a foe of cyclones due to the fact that it can blow them apart, and NASA’s Aqua satellite discovered wind shear pressing Hurricane Dumazile’s clouds south of its center.

Hurricane Dumazile is moving through the Southern Indian Ocean and has actually moved into a location of strong northern vertical wind shear. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer is the instrument aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite passed over Dumazile on March 7 and revealed a distinct low-level center of blood circulation, and the majority of the clouds were pressed south of the center.

On March 7 at 10 a.m. EST (1500 UTC) Hurricane Dumazile was focused near 27.9 degrees south latitude and 56.2 degrees east longitude, about 447 nautical miles south of St. Denis, La Reunion Island. Dumazile was relocating to the south-southeast at 8 knots (9.2 miles per hour/148 kph). Optimum sustained winds dropped to 40 knots (46 miles per hour/74 kph).

The Joint Hurricane Caution Center kept in mind that Dumazile is moving southeast and is compromising quickly under the negative conditions of cooler sea surface area temperature levels and increasing vertical wind shear.

By Rob Gutro .
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center .

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